Walkerville Holiday Walk Featured A Showcase of Local Authors and Artists

Local Authors and Artists Could Be Found Throughout The Annual Walkerville Holiday Walk

A stroll down Wyandotte Street as its stretches along Walkerville can be rather edifying, if nothing else, during the local Business Improvement Area’s Annual Walkerville Holiday Walk on Saturday. The fact that this part of Windsor is named Walkerville may be nothing but a circumstantial matter.

While the town, as it stands today, was largely built by distiller Hiram Walker, and his family, it turns out Walker wasn’t its first whiskey baron. Almost fifty years before he came over from America, one Angus Macintosh was distilling whiskey and making brandy.

That, says Elaine Weeks, author of the definitive history of this area of Windsor, Walkerville, Whiskey Town Extraordinaire, ended when Macintosh was called home in 1828. Today, about the only trace of his presence are the streets Moy and Hall, named after Moy Hall, the Macintosh ancestral home in Inverness, Scotland.

Weeks had set up a table at the Hodge Podge Vintage Emporium to promote such titles as 500 Ways You Know You’re From Windsor – a Canadian best seller – and the latest work of her and husband Chris Edwards, 5000 Ways To Know You’re From Detroit. The Detroit book has more ways, she says, because Detroit is much larger than Windsor.

A few storefronts west at the area’s independent bookstore, Biblioasis, Windsor native son, now a resident of Toronto, Kevin Shea was signing his latest release simply titled The Hall. Of coffee table size, the book, his 17th on hockey, follows the history of Canada’s Hockey Hall of Fame.

Author Kevin Shea

Author Kevin Shea holds his 17th book on hockey, this one commemorating the Hockey Hall of Fame’s 75th anniversary, in front of Biblioasis bookstore during the annual Walkerville Holiday Walk on Nov. 21, 2018. Photo by Robert Tuomi / Eyes On Windsor.

One of the oddities he discovered, he told Eyes on Windsor, is that originally, some 75 years ago, the plan was to put the Hall in Kingston. At the time it was believed hockey was invented in the Limestone City. While the claim was challenged by other towns and cities, it was money – an inability to raise enough – that had its founders cart their idea off to Toronto and a spot on the grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition. This eventually led to its current home in an old bank building in downtown Toronto.

These days the once fine manual methods of printing art and photography are almost history themselves. But that is not the case at two Walkerville art centres. The Windsor Artists’ Co-op was showcasing the work of John Pike. His black and white gritty photography is handmade from 35mm film negatives. A practice overshadowed, almost to extinction, by digital printing.

John Pike photograph of Detroit on display during the Walkerville Holiday Walk

Photographer John Pike uses old 35 mm technology to photograph the grittier side of Detroit, which was on display at the Walkerville Artists’ Co-op during the town’s annual Holiday Walk on Nov. 17, 2018. Photo by Robert Tuomi / Eyes On Windsor.

Next door, Levigator Press, a Print Studio and Gallery, was chock-a-block with probably some of the oldest printing technology in the city. There founder Jodi Green uses a variety of time tested hand press technologies – including the laborious setting of lead type – to create her works. Green also holds workshops on a wide range of almost forgotten book publishing technologies.

Art of Jodi Green on display at Levigator Press

Art of Jodi Green on display at Levigator Press during the annual Walkerville Holiday Walk on Nov. 17, 2018. Photo by Robert Tuomi / Eyes On Windsor.

Art of Jodi Green on display at Levigator Press

Art of Jodi Green on display at Levigator Press during the annual Walkerville Holiday Walk on Nov. 17, 2018. Photo by Robert Tuomi / Eyes On Windsor.

The Annual Walkerville Holiday Walk took place on Nov. 16 & 17 this year.

Robert Tuomi

Article and photos by Robert Tuomi

For over a decade, Robert has covered local news and community events. Initially as a contributor to CBC Radio’s local morning show and then as the long-time producer and host of CJAM’s The Rest of the News and as a journalist at the Windsor Square. A graduate of the Nikon School of Photography he enjoys illustrating his reports with what he sees through his camera’s lens.