University Of Windsor Wind Ensemble Delights Audience During Annual Spring Concert

The University of Windsor Wind Ensemble delighted their audience during their Spring concert at the Capitol Theatre on Sunday, April 8, 2018.

(Photo above: Members of the University of Windsor Wind Ensemble are prepared and ready to start their concert at The Capitol Theatre in downtown Windsor, Ontario, on Sunday, April 8, 2018. Photo by Robert Tuomi / Eyes On Windsor.)

It may have been a chilly Spring day outside, but the wind instruments being played on the stage Sunday afternoon at downtown’s Capitol Theatre were, as one audience member surmised, “nothing but hot.”

With one exception, the compositions making up the Spring Concert of the University of Windsor’s Wind Ensemble were almost exclusively modern, all of them by young or youngish Canadian composers.

Each was expertly handled by the assembled 42 musicians who played to perfection almost every manner of wind instrument possible. This include flutes, trombones, clarinets, tuba and various saxophone types. Musical support came from upright bassists and percussionists.

No doubt the ensemble’s music director, Dr. Nicholas Papador, the University of Windsor’s Associate Professor of Percussion, kept a watchful eye on the afternoon’s percussionists. Ensemble member Martin Schultz was joined by four guest drummers consisting of Andrew Busch, Sondra Chaif, Aaron Eichler and Vanessa Harnish.

Dr. Nicholas Papador prepares to start the University of Windsor Wind Ensemble’s Spring Concert

Dr. Nicholas Papador prepares to start the University of Windsor Wind Ensemble’s Spring Concert at The Capitol Theatre in downtown Windsor, Ontario, on Sunday, April 8, 2018. Photo by Robert Tuomi / Eyes On Windsor.

Opening with Brian Balmages’ “Gravity Wave,” the program moved forward to Alex Eddington’s “Flight of the Hawks,” and continued in an upbeat vein from there including the second last composition before intermission. Shelley Marwood’s “On A Whim,” added a bit of her characteristic whimsy to the afternoon.

After Intermission, Nimrod, written in 1899 by Sir Edward Elgar and part of his Enigma Variations, was the only “oldie” among the works. It was followed with a tribute of sorts to famed American composer David Maslanka who died last year. The Massachusetts native won his masters and doctoral degrees at Michigan State University.

A delightful afternoon came to a Biblical end with a performance of the four-part Noah’s Ark, written by Bert Appermont and based on the Bible story.

Conducting duties were shared by Bonnie Trealout, a University of Windsor fourth year clarinet student, and University of Toronto Professor of Music Gillian MacKay.

For more information about the University of Windsor Wind Ensemble visit: http://www.uwindsor.ca/music/351/university-wind-ensemble

Robert Tuomi
Article & Photos by Robert Tuomi

For over a decade, Robert has covered local news and community events. Initially as a contributor to CBC Radio’s local morning show and then as the long-time producer and host of CJAM’s The Rest of the News and as a journalist at the Windsor Square. A graduate of the Nikon School of Photography he enjoys illustrating his reports with what he sees through his camera’s lens.