Art Gallery of Windsor Hind vs Hind Exhibit: A Notable Difference Between Generations

To illustrate how art changes over time, the Art Gallery of Windsor currently presents the case of William George Richardson Hind and his great, great, great nephew Dave. In Hind vs. Hind, on display on the third floor of the Gallery, curator Simon Frank presents a rather stark look at the differences between the two as a means to promote their similarities.

(Above photo: William G. R. Hind Canadian urban landscapes railway crossing on display as part of the Hind vs Hind exhibit at the Art Gallery of Windsor. Photo by Robert Tuomi / Eyes On Windsor.)

Some one hundred years ago, William, a well-known and gifted artist, in the style of Cornelius Krieghoff, painted landscapes of various locations across Canada. His mediums were watercolours, pencil sketches and oils, with a method acquiescing to popular tastes of his time.

Dave, on the other hand, a self-described “thing-maker,” is the ultimate modern artist and somewhat of a recycler with his employment of discarded aluminum, a heavy metal. His works are also a response to his times.

An appropriate comparison between the two might be to describe the earlier Hind’s work as quiet, almost pastoral, equal to the symphonic lullabies of a long gone era while the current Hind’s work embodies the characteristics of full frontal, in-your-face, brash, high volume heavy metal music.

While the younger Hind incorporates metal for its hard-edged glossiness, he is nonetheless somewhat whimsical. It is a trait rarely, if ever, assigned to his departed uncle who was particularly known for a severe attention to exacting detail and correct perspective.

Dave Hind’s landscapes are cornucopias of ambiguity, flush with nuances and mixes of exact and totally abstract depictions of what he sees in a landscape. A good example is his portrait of Toronto’s waterfront, which, with its many characters, tells many stories.

Much of his work has the brilliant contrast of seeming to be totally unlike anything William had painted. This is most evident in a comparison of Hind’s modern Toronto with William’s sketch of an early urban road leading from a railway crossing. One is ostentatious, the latter serene. And yet both uncle and nephew share a unique style laced with curious similarities.

William G. R. Hind Canadian urban landscapes railway crossing on display as part of the Hind vs Hind exhibit at the Art Gallery of Windsor

William G. R. Hind Canadian urban landscapes railway crossing on display as part of the Hind vs Hind exhibit at the Art Gallery of Windsor. Photo by Robert Tuomi / Eyes On Windsor.

The pair do nothing if not showcase the many iterations of the progress of art from quiet representations to eclectic, animated portrayals of a reality only replicable through the eyes of an artist.

If this is how far art has travelled over a hundred years, the curious question is what will a work by a future relative of the contemporary Hind look like a century from now?

The exhibit will be on display until May 13, 2018.

For more information visit http://www.agw.ca

Robert Tuomi
Article & Photo by Robert Tuomi

For over a decade, Robert has covered local news and community events. Initially as a contributor to CBC Radio’s local morning show and then as the long-time producer and host of CJAM’s The Rest of the News and as a journalist at the Windsor Square. A graduate of the Nikon School of Photography he enjoys illustrating his reports with what he sees through his camera’s lens.